Bible Q’s: Exodus 4:24-26

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God has chosen Moses to lead the people of Israel out of captivity and he is on his way back to Egypt.

…and then out of nowhere….

Exodus 4:24-26 “At a lodging place on the way, the Lord met Moses and was about to kill him. But Zipporah took a flint knife, cut offer her son’s  foreskin and touched Moses’ feet with it. ‘Surely you are the bridegroom of blood to me’, she said. So the Lord let him alone. (At that time she said ‘bridegroom of blood’, referring to circumcision.)”

…and then Moses is back to being on his way to Egypt and the story picks up like this section never existed.

What? Why was God mad at Moses? What on earth happened???? And why does Zipporah conclude that a circumcision is in order? An animal sacrifice, an incense offering, monetary offering…no a circumcision is the perfect choice. Her statement of ‘surely you are a bridegroom of blood to me’ is supposed to clear up her motivation, but to be honest, I have no idea what this means.

I liked the commentary by Matthew Henry, from the Blue Letter Bible:

Exd 4:24-31

Moses is here going to Egypt, and we are told,

  • I. How God met him in anger, v. 24-26. This is a very difficult passage of story; much has been written, and excellently written, to make it intelligible; we will try to make it improving. Here is,

    • 1. The sin of Moses, which was neglecting to circumcise his son. This was probably the effect of his being unequally yoked with a Midianite, who was too indulgent of her child, while Moses was too indulgent of her. Note,

      • (1.) We have need to watch carefully over our own hearts, lest fondness for any relation prevail above our love to God, and take us off from our duty to him. It is charged upon Eli that he honoured his sons more than God (1 Sa. 2:29); and see Mt. 10:37.
      • (2.) Even good men are apt to cool in their zeal for God and duty when they have long been deprived of the society of the faithful: solitude has its advantages, but they seldom counterbalance the loss of Christian communion.
    • 2. God’s displeasure against him. He met him, and, probably by a sword in an angel’s hand, sought to kill him. This was a great change; very lately God was conversing with him, and lodging a trust in him, as a friend; and now he is coming forth against him as an enemy. Note,

      • (1.) Omissions are sins, and must come into judgment, and particularly the contempt and neglect of the seals of the covenant; for it is a sign that we undervalue the promises of the covenant, and are displeased with the conditions of it. He that has made a bargain, and is not willing to seal and ratify it, one may justly suspect, neither likes it nor designs to stand to it.
      • (2.) God takes notice of, and is much displeased with, the sins of his own people. If they neglect their duty, let them expect to hear of it by their consciences, and perhaps to feel from it by cross providences: for this cause many are sick and weak, as some think Moses was here.
    • 3. The speedy performance of the duty for the neglect of which God had now a controversy with him. His son must be circumcised; Moses is unable to circumcise him; therefore, in this case of necessity, Zipporah does it, whether with passionate words (expressing her dislike of the ordinance itself, or at least the administration of it to so young a child, and in a journey), as to me it seems, or with proper words-solemnly expressing the espousal of the child to God by the covenant of circumcision (as some read it) or her thankfulness to God for sparing her husband, giving him a new life, and thereby giving her, as it were, a new marriage to him, upon her circumcising her son (as others read it)-I cannot determine: but we learn,

      • (1.) That when God discovers to us what is amiss in our lives we must give all diligence to amend it speedily, and particularly return to the duties we have neglected.
      • (2.) The putting away of our sins is indispensably necessary to the removal of God’s judgements. This is the voice of every rod, it calls to us to return to him that smites us.
      • 4. The release of Moses thereupon: So he let him go; the distemper went off, the destroying angel withdrew, and all was well: only Zipporah cannot forget the fright she was in, but will unreasonably call Moses a bloody husband, because he obliged her to circumcise the child; and, upon this occasion (it is probable), he sent them back to his father-in-law, that they might not create him any further uneasiness. Note,

        • (1.) When we return to God in a way of duty he will return to us in a way of mercy; take away the cause, and the effect will cease.

        • (2.) We must resolve to bear it patiently, if our zeal for God and his institutions be misinterpreted and discouraged by some that should understand themselves, and us, and their duty, better, as David’s zeal was misinterpreted by Michal; but if this be to be vile, if this be to be bloody, we must be yet more so.

        • (3.) When we have any special service to do for God we should remove as far from us as we can that which is likely to be our hindrance. Let the dead bury their dead, but follow thou me.

 

I will pray for God to show me what His calling is on my life and what I need to clean up in order to partake in that journey.

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About the Author : Kylene Almeida

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